Your show's on-air audience and the online audience are vastly different beasts. And they each want their dinner served to them in a particlar way.

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As more people access their media online, radio presenters and producers have to shift their thinking about their audiences.  When it was simple - just on-air and live- we thought about ways of bringing the audience to us. We promoted the time and the station. We relied on surveys and audience support to work out our popularity.

Online audiences are tuning in differently. There are people who listen to podcasts and there are people who find your content because they were searching for something else or because a friend shared it in social media. Some of them find it because they missed your show on air.

There are people who listen on computers and tables and others who listen on phones. The one thing they all have in common though is they all have to click to listen.

How do we radio people make that happen?

No one is going to click on audio player with an mp3 loaded into it and maybe the name of your program and episode number. Okay, maybe your mum will and your best friend.

Visualising radio - adding something to look at (text, photos or video) can make a hell of a difference. here are two examples:

Music Segment

It is not unthinkable that a radio program can attract a bigger audience online than it does on air. Just check out the BBC's The Rap Show with Charlie Sloth. In fact, spend a minute there to take a look at how the content moves from on air to online.

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Here's some things we noticed about it:

1. There is not a lot of emphasis on listening to the full epsiodes.

2.There is more emphasis on clips. One segment from the radio show - Fire in the Booth- gets lots of attention. The segment is videotaped.

3. You can click through to a profile about Charlie and they use the same photo of Charlie a lot.

4. The front page tells me how to contact the show, what time it is on and what stations I can tune in to hear it.

5. There are a lot of photos and not much writing.

From Interview to Article

You have done a great interview with either a well know person or someone who hasn't got a big profile online yet. You want to put it online. Most of us know how to upload audio to an online player or podcast tool but how many of us think of our interview on a platform that relies on visuals (text, photos and video) to attract an audience.

We can hear you yelling that we're adding to your workload! That's why we have included some quick fixes for those of you who still don't take online seriously!

Quick Fixes!

1. Scan the internet for the best article you can find about the person and embed it in the page where you are putting the interview. That way at least people can scan the article to see if they are interested.

2. Include a photo and a few lines about your guest.

Best Practice!

Write an article based on your interview. Grab a few choice quotes from the audio and write a couple of paragraphs around them.  At least you're giving your online audiences a taste of what they will get if they click on the audio player. Include photographs. Go on! It won't take that long!

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