Certainly, the art of documentaries and features lends itself to being multiplatform but that is more than writing a few articles and including some photographs.

When you are setting out to do a documentary, a substantial part of the work involves research and preparation. Identifying people to interview, deciding on locations and developing the line of questioning are all things we do very early in the stage. Most experienced producers will suggest that you should even have a strong idea of the narrative structure you are going to create for the story.

These days, without exception if you are pitching documentaries you will be expected to include the multiplatform potential in your proposal. You might even be expected to include a digital content plan.

The great thing about planning content for all the platforms is you can incorporate it in your plans from the start.  You might want to take a photographer/videographer with you when you do interviews. You might want a writer/social media person on your team. If you are thinking about applying for funding for your project or getting a commission, it's really worth thniking about including them in your budget.

At the centre of your plan is the story. You can start to think think of it like this:

Digital Content Strategy for Radio TV

People who have been working in the media industry for sometime, tend to be "married" to the platform they started on putting that at the centre of their planning. The kind of project that starts with the sentence: "I'm going to make a radio documentary or podcast" with the online content as an add-on, something secondary to be completed afterwards. Making the shift out of the marriage to one platform has been challenging for both traditional media organisations and the people who work in them.

If you have read the audience section of this website you'll know that audiences are everywhere now. Your challenge is to put content which suits each platform where it will engage any of these audiences with your story.